Healthcare Worker Burnout

Healthcare facilities across the nation are under an increasing amount of pressure to do more with less. From a healthcare staffing shortage to increasing patient volumes, the strain on available resources is becoming increasingly more palpable.

Nowhere is this resource strain more strongly felt than among the nurses, doctors and technicians that make treatment and patient care possible. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, between now and 2026, an additional 203,700 new registered nurses will be needed annually to fill newly created positions and replace retiring clinicians. Additionally, the Association of American Medical Colleges predicts that the United States will experience a shortage of up to nearly 122,000 physicians by 2032 as demand for care outpaces new medical college graduates.

While many institutions are taking great strides to help fill these workforce gaps, healthcare facilities are being forced to rely upon their current clinicians to make up the difference in the interim. Consequently, healthcare practitioners of all kinds are managing larger than normal caseloads, consistently working mandatory overtime and are struggling to combat the effects of healthcare worker burnout.

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