Staying Healthy During Cold and Flu Season

Tips and Tricks for Nurses

As a nurse, your risk of catching a viral illness from an infected patient during cold and flu season is high. Additionally, your line of work requires that you be out in the community where you could possibly be exposed to COVID-19 (which shares many similar symptoms with the cold and flu viruses). Thankfully, there are several simple lifestyle changes that you can implement to enhance your immune system’s response. Keep reading to find out how you can protect and improve your health this cold and flu season.

10 Ways Nurses Can Stay Healthy During Cold and Flu Season

1. Eat a Balanced Diet

eating healthy during cold and flu seasonDid you know that nearly 70% of your body’s immune system resides in your gastrointestinal system? This means your gut plays a critical role in keeping you healthy during cold and flu season. You can improve your gastrointestinal system’s overall health by consuming a balanced diet, one that is low in fat and sugar and high in protein and fiber. Furthermore, there are several foods that you can eat to give your immune system an added boost. Red peppers, for instance, contain three times as much vitamin C as a Florida orange and shellfish (i.e. oysters, crabs, lobsters and mussels) are packed with zinc. For a more complete list of immune boosting foods, click here.

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A Day in the Life of a Social Worker

Interview with Jennifer Neer

Within the social work field, there are many different sub-specialists that are committed to working with a specific demographic or issue. Jennifer Neer, licensed social worker at Winnebago Mental Health Institute, is a prime example of one of these specialists. In her work as a psychiatric social worker, Jennifer plays a critical role in the patient’s journey to continued wellness. She secures resources and additional treatment that will help the patient succeed in post-treatment life.

Keep reading to find out more about Jennifer’s story and this fascinating field of work.


1. What initially attracted you to a career as a social worker?

Jennifer Neer Social WorkerI would have to say that I came to the conclusion that a career in social work was right for me after I had a progression of jobs working with people. Before I got my social work license, I had the opportunity to work with autistic children in my school district and with survivors of domestic violence. It was from these experiences that I realized I had a passion for working with people. However, I didn’t immediately make a career transition after having these jobs. Around 2012, I was working in the insurance industry and there was a reduction in force at my company. I was left without at job. At the same time, there were personal circumstances that led me to reevaluate my life. It was then that I decided I wanted to purse a license in social work. Continue reading

Am I sick enough to stay home?

Last Modified: Aug 11, 2020 @ 12:35 pm by Katy Konkel

7 Symptoms to Consider When Calling Out of Work

You wake up one morning with a little tickle in the back of your throat. The headache you’ve been treating all night with aspirin just won’t go away. Despite the thermostat being set at a comfortable 68° F, you’re feeling hot and sweaty. Are you sick enough to stay home from work?

When you work in the healthcare industry, deciding if you are too sick to go into work can be a tough decision. You’ve experienced firsthand how stressful things can be when your floor or unit is short staffed. You also know that your patients are counting on you to provide an exceptional level of care. And let’s not forget, no one wants to be patient zero, the one who shares the “sickness” with everyone else.

Taking the time to carefully evaluate your symptoms and the likelihood that you are contagious is the best way to determine if you are sick enough to stay home. In consultation with your doctor, we recommend using the following symptoms as a guide: Continue reading

Advice from Healthcare Professionals on Choosing Your Specialty

Choosing-Nursing-SpecialtyBeing a part of the healthcare world, on many occasions I find myself thrown into discussions with healthcare professionals or future healthcare professionals in some way, shape, or form. One of my absolute favorite things about my job is the opportunity to work with local colleges and universities to have discussions with healthcare students. These opportunities not only give us a platform for our company branding, but they also give students the chance to learn about travel and per-diem work. They have been surprisingly educational for me as well. Continue reading