Self-Care for Nurses

You have probably heard the expression that “you can’t pour water from an empty cup.” But what reservoirs of replenishment are available to healthcare workers battling a global pandemic? While there are no quick and easy fixes for this dilemma, one thing is certain: self-care for nurses has never been needed more.

What is self-care?

Self-care is defined as “anything you do to take care of yourself so you can stay physically, mentally and emotionally well” (Everyday Health). In essence, self-care is the sum of all the steps or actions you take to combat the negative effects of stress (e.g., anxiety, depression, lack of motivation, restlessness).

It is important to note that self-care is not the same as being selfish (lacking consideration for others) or self-indulgent (giving unrestrained gratification to one’s own desires). In fact, it is the complete opposite. Those who regularly practice self-care are better equipped to meet the demands of life and the needs of others on a consistent basis.

Continue reading

4 Ways Nurses Can Advocate for Patients

“Patient advocacy” is a buzzword floating around every American healthcare system, but what does this catch phrase really mean? Beyond that, how can clinicians, especially nurses, best advocate for patients under their care? Keep reading to find out the answers to these questions and more.

What Is Patient Advocacy?

An advocate is “one who supports or promotes the interests of a cause or group” (Merriam-Webster). Therefore, patient advocacy is the act of “supporting” or “promoting” the interests of patients.

Regardless of their specialty, all nurses have an obligation to advocate for their patients. In essence, this means nurses have an obligation to protect their patients from harm, regardless of the harm’s source. While nurses never tell their patients what to do, they undertake actions to uphold the rights of those in their care.

Continue reading

The Pros and Cons of Travel Nursing

Are you considering taking the leap into travel nursing? Are you a current or prospective nursing student researching your future career options? No matter where you are in your nursing career, if travel nursing is a track you are seriously considering, you need to know the truth about it to help you make the right decision. This career move is unlike any other in the nursing field, and it comes with advantages and disadvantages. The following list outlines the pros and cons of travel nursing to help you determine if it is the right career choice for you.

Pros and Cons of Travel Nursing

Pro: Ability to Travel

pros and cons of travel nursing the ability to travelOn the list of the pros and cons of travel nursing, the ability to travel often is one of the biggest advantages. Travel nursing can take you all across the country. Some nurses may even determine where they want to work based on the places they want to visit. Although your primary reason for traveling is your job, during your down time you can explore and see all that your new location has to offer. This unique feature of travel nursing allows you to play and get paid. Those with wanderlust will especially enjoy this perk of the jobs. While you typically will not be eligible for PTO as a travel nurse, you will still have the opportunity to visit new places, allowing you to check items off your travel bucket list during your free time.

Continue reading

Psychiatric Nursing

7 Things You Should Know

Psychiatric nursing jobs are among the most in-demand jobs within the healthcare industry. However, preconceived notions often prevent many clinicians from applying for these rewarding positions. Find out the seven things you should know about psychiatric nursing before passing it over for a different nursing specialty.

1. What Psychiatric Nursing Entails

two clinicians discussing psychiatric nursingPsychiatric nursing, also known as mental health nursing, is a specialized healthcare field that involves caring for the psychological and physiological needs of patients with mental health conditions or behavioral problems. Consequently, psychiatric nurses are responsible for assessing their patient’s mental health, developing a care plan, implementing that care plan and evaluating its effectiveness over time.

Continue reading

Women’s History Month: A Celebration

In 1987, President Ronald Reagan, at the request of the National Women’s History Project and Congress, designated March as Women’s History Month. Since that historic occasion 34 years ago, each March has been set apart to “reflect on the often-overlooked contributions of women to United States history” (History.com).

In keeping with the spirit of the month and as a certified Women’s Business Enterprise, we thought it would be appropriate to ask our employees a series of questions about the women that have played a significant role in their lives. Below are some of their answers.


Who has been the most influential woman in your life and why?

“My mother has been the most influential woman in my life. She is strong, confident and very intelligent. She taught me what it means to work hard and enjoy life. She taught me how important it is to have a strong support system of female friends and how wonderful life can be with great girlfriends.” – Brianna H.

Continue reading

Your Travel Nurse Tax Guide


The content contained in this travel nurse tax guide is meant for general informational purposes only. We are not tax professionals. Please consult with your tax advisor before filing your taxes.


When compared with a traditional staff nurse, filing taxes for a travel nurse can be a bit more complicated. From being able to prove your tax home status to knowing what states to file in, the process can seem initially overwhelming. This travel nurse tax guide has the information you need to start making sense of this daunting process.

Travel Nurse Tax Tips

1. Maintain a Tax Home

When it comes to protecting your earnings as a travel nurse, one of the most important things that you can do is establish and maintain a tax home.

What is a tax home?

image of a travel nurse tax homeThe Internal Revenue Service (IRS) defines a “tax home” as “the entire city or general area where your main place of business or work is located, regardless of where you maintain your family home.” In other words, your tax home is the geographical region where you earn most of your nursing income.

Continue reading

How Hospital Design Affects Nurses…

And How to Improve It

Dealing with a global pandemic is challenging, but it is also an opportunity to acknowledge the miraculous work performed by our doctors, nurses and other medical professionals. These people keep saving lives day after day, and we need to do whatever we can to make their jobs easier and more bearable. That is why their superiors insist on the most functional hospital design they can create. So how does this factor affect the nurses in particular, since they are the ones who spend the majority of their time caring for the patients?

Less walking, more nursing

nurse running due to poor hospital designThis is something the patients and the doctors probably do not notice, but the fact is that nurses spend most of their time walking. Not helping people, not caring for them, not saving their lives – but walking!

Continue reading

Top 10 Correctional Nursing Skills

Correctional nursing. You have probably heard a few rumors about this nursing specialty, but do you know what it takes to succeed in this alternative healthcare setting? Join us as we explore the top ten correctional nursing skills that are needed to provide the best patient care possible.

Please Note: As a correctional nurse, you will always work in concert with the facility’s attending physician or dentist.

Correctional Nursing Skills

1. Mental Health

According to the American Psychological Association, 64% of jail inmates, 54% of state prisoners and 45% of federal prisoners are dealing with a mental health disorder. These disorders range from mild cases of anxiety and depression to schizophrenia and psychosis. As a correctional nurse, you will need to have a firm understanding of the different mental health disorders, their treatment plans and the possible side-effects of any prescribed medications. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA) is a terrific resource for any clinician looking to expand their correctional nursing skillset.

Continue reading

Celebrating African American Leaders in Healthcare

In honor of Black History Month, we are taking a moment to commemorate African American leaders in healthcare. Join us as we examine the lives, work and achievements of four truly inspirational figures that changed the healthcare landscape for the better.

African American Leaders in Healthcare

Mary Eliza Mahoney, Professional Nurse

Mary Eliza MahoneyAfrican American Leaders in Healthcare_Mahoney was born in the spring of 1845. Her parents were freed slaves that had moved to Boston, Massachusetts from North Carolina. During her early years, Mahoney attended the Phillips School in Boston, which after 1855, became one of the first integrated schools in the country.

As a teenager, Mahoney became interested in a career in nursing. She initially worked as an untrained practical nurse for several prominent white families before entering a formal training program. On March 23, 1878, Mahoney became the “first coloured girl admitted” to the nursing program at the New England Hospital for Women and Children. The program ran for 16 months and was quite intensive. Students were required to attend lectures and work, resulting in 16-hour+ days.

Continue reading

How to Rediscover Your Passion for Nursing

Do you dread going into work each day? Do you feel like you no longer have patience and empathy for your patients? You are not alone. Many nurses are feeling or have felt this way. Come along with us as we explore the nursing burnout phenomenon and address ways that you can rediscover your passion for nursing.

What is nursing burnout?

a female nurse dealing with healthcare worker burnoutThe National Institutes of Health (NIH) defines nursing burnout as “a widespread phenomenon characterized by a reduction in nurses’ energy that manifests in emotional exhaustion, lack of motivation and feelings of frustration and may lead to reductions in work efficacy.” In other words, nursing burnout is the emotional, mental and physical exhaustion that results from prolonged exposure to stress.  It affects the nurse’s well-being and their ability to provide exceptional patient care.

Continue reading