Ways to Enrich Your Nursing Career

In the fast-paced world of medicine, it can be difficult to remain up-to-date with current trends in nursing. Between completing long shifts, combating burnout, and finding new professional opportunities, nurses can use all the resources they can get in order to enrich and grow their careers. Here is a short list of where to begin whether you’re rediscovering your passion for nursing, growing your professional network, or becoming an expert in your specialty.

Join a Professional Organization

Professional nursing organizations can be valuable resources for nurses in terms of networking and professional development. A professional organization exists to advance a particular profession, support the interests of people working in that profession and serve the public good. They can help nurses maintain practice proficiency and keep professional knowledge up-to-date. Professional nursing organizations can also present a united voice of advocacy in the community and represent the objectives of the members. The American Nursing Association, International Council of Nurses, and the National Black Nurses Association are some examples of professional nursing orgs.

Attend Conferences and Networking Events

Professional nursing conferences are where cutting-edge developments in the field are first showcased to the world. At these conferences, nurses can learn about the latest innovations as well as discuss new concepts and current events in nursing. With the opportunity to attend seminars by renowned speakers, exchange ideas with other medical professionals, and make introductions to potential new employers, conferences are invaluable resources to nurses, especially to enrich your nursing career. Healthcare Traveler’s Take is a conference that focuses on providing new opportunities to travel nurses, so if that’s up your alley, learn more about it here!

enrich your nursing career

Subscribe and Listen to Podcasts

Podcasting is one of the fastest growing media types in the world and provides easy access to new information for nurses. You can listen on-the-go; whether you’re commuting to work or on your lunch break, you can easily tune in and stay on top of industry trends. Check out our list of 5 favorite nursing podcasts for a few ideas of where to start!

enrich your nursing career

Dive Into Peer-Reviewed Journals

Peer-reviewed journals are how most medical research reaches professionals, and they’re available to nurses so they can stay abreast of the latest developments in the field. Nurses can choose from tax-deductible publications dedicated to a wide range of topics from cardiology to infectious disease. Available in print or online, these scholarly articles cover the latest technological and treatment advances and offer tips for integrating them into a nurse’s practice. A good place to start is the American Journal of Nursing, a free resource where you can start reading in-depth about whatever concepts pique your interest.

Tune Into a Webinar in Your Specialty

Professional development can easily be done from home with the help of webinars. Stay current on the latest evidence-based learning and clinical practices by simply logging on to a webinar in your specialty—there are plenty to choose from. These educational sessions offer knowledge and tools to enhance patient outcomes and are available live or on-demand. Check out a list of 2022 nursing webinars here.

enrich your nursing career

5 of Our Favorite Nursing Podcasts

Podcasts are fantastic tools for professional development and feeling connected in the healthcare community. Whether you’re on your commute to work, doing laundry or dishes, or cooking a meal, a podcast is the perfect accompaniment. Here are five of our favorite nursing podcasts.

  1. Good Nurse Bad Nurse

Good Nurse Bad Nurse is a podcast for RNs who love interesting and thought-provoking stories from the field. In each episode, the podcast hosts, nurses Tina and Sam, take turns telling true stories about life as an RN. One story, told by the “good nurse” will be uplifting and inspiring. The other story, told by the “bad nurse,” will typically explore the darker side of the healthcare field—such as complications, mistakes, and dangers on the job. This podcast discusses hot-button issues in the medical field, and sometimes even true crime. It also features special guests and interviews with medical personnel. If you’re looking for a gripping yet fun podcast, with just the right amount of light-heartedness, check out Good Nurse Bad Nurse.

nursing podcasts

  1. The Nurse Keith Show

For nurses who want a podcast that focuses mainly on career advice, check out The Nurse Keith Show. Nurse Keith is a registered nurse, board-certified nursing coach, and specialist in holistic healing. The Nurse Keith Show helps nurses make informed career choices and explores the ins and outs of achieving your goals as a healthcare professional. In addition to career coaching, the podcast also explores current events in the medical field and inspiring guest interviews.

nursing podcasts

 

  1. Nursing Uncensored

Nursing Uncensored is an edgier podcast for the RN who loves (sometimes dark) humor. The podcast is hosted by Adrienne Behning, a registered nurse and entertainer who believes in bringing a little levity into the conversation about healthcare. With everything nurses go through on a weekly basis, Adrienne believes you have to laugh sometimes to get through the difficult parts of the job. With interviews, relatable stories, and the occasional curse word, Nursing Uncensored is for healthcare professionals who aren’t afraid to tell it like it is.

nursing podcasts

 

  1. Bad Decisions with Katie Duke

Motivational speaker and nurse practitioner Katie Duke hosts a podcast that shares stories of both struggle and success. In her show, Katie pushes boundaries to explore the life decisions that don’t always turn out like you expect. In a society that glorifies perfection, nobody wants to reveal their bad decisions. “Bad Decisions” shifts the conversation to prove the importance of owning your failures as a necessity to success, especially in the nursing world.

nursing podcasts

  1. Real Talk School of Nursing

The Real Talk School of Nursing podcast is a bit different from the other podcasts on this list. That’s because, instead of focusing on life on the job, it focuses on life around the job. This podcast is for nurses who want to hear relatable discussions about balancing their work as a nurse practitioner and personal life. Real Talk School of Nursing also interviews professionals in the medical field and discusses personal experiences in this line of work.

nursing podcasts

 

Looking to start a new chapter in your nursing career? Apply for a travel RN contract with Premier!


A Guide to the Best Nursing Shoes

While a lot has changed in the nursing world over the years, one thing remains the same: the job still requires clinicians to be standing and/or walking for hours on end. Lots of nurses experience back and foot pain as a result of being on their feet for 12 hours at a time, which is why their choice in footwear can be crucial to getting them through their day. We have taken the guesswork out of picking out decent nursing shoes and selected a few pairs that are guaranteed to help you make it through your shift pain-free.

  1. On Cloudflow Sneakers

Swiss brand “On” prides themselves on their signature CloudTec technology that is designed to make the wearer feel as if they are walking on air, which is why they are so popular among nurses. They make a great everyday slip-on sneaker that is both trendy and highly comfortable. Many nurses prefer to add a little pop of color to their scrubs, and the color selection is great for customizing your sneaker to your favorite scrubs.

nursing shoes, oncloud

On CloudFlow Sneakers

  1. Dansko Clogs

The clog has become a staple in many nurses’ wardrobes. These comfy Dansko clogs offer plenty of support and even mold to the wearer’s foot after broken in. The best part? You can pick and choose the patterns and designs of the shoe to fit your personality.

nursing shoes, dansko clogs

Dansko Clogs

  1. Nurse Mates Dorin Shoe

There’s nothing more iconic than a white nursing shoe. The Dorin Shoe by Nurse Mates boasts a modern take on a classic style and is designed specifically for nurses. They have great lumbar and arch support while also being sleek enough to wear both in and out of scrubs.

nursing shoes, nursemates dorin

  1. Nike Air Zoom Pulse

Nike’s Air Zoom Pulse sneakers were built specifically with clinicians in mind. The outsole is designed to maintain good traction on wet or dry surfaces, which is key when navigating in a hospital setting. Not to mention that the slip-on style is just as easy to take on and off as a clog.

nursing shoes, nike air zoom pulse

Nike Air Zoom Pulse

  1. Clove Shoes

Cloves are well-loved in the healthcare community, and for good reason. Not only are they endlessly comfortable, but their secret weapon is how easy they are to keep clean. Cloves are best known for being fluid-resistant, which in the medical world, is a huge draw. This shoe has been heavily researched and tested by nurses, so you know it’s a good one.

Clove, nursing shoes

Clove Nursing Shoes

  1. Allbirds

Allbirds are a great all-around shoe for the nurse who loves keeping up with the latest trends. These shoes are actually made of wool and are super-light, making them a popular go-to nursing shoe.

allbirds, nursing shoes

Allbirds

  1. Hoka One Arahi 4

Hoka is a brand that is commonly worn in the medical field and has been promoted for their ability to provide ultimate levels of comfort and support. These Hoka One Arahi 4 sneakers are ideal shoes for nurses due to their ability to provide great lumbar support and cushioning. They rose to popularity as nursing shoes because of their Meta-Rocker technology:” the U-shaped, or “rocker”-like midsole allows for smoother impacts and pace transitions.

Hoka One, Hoka One Arahi 4, Nursing Shoes

Hoka One Arahi 4

Why Continuing Education for Nurses Is Important


Looking for information on continuing education for nurses? First, read this guest blog post from Raelene Jessica and then check out the links below. 


As we enter the second year of restrictions and lockdowns, healthcare workers are still in high demand. Nurses are being spread thin and it has caused a critical shortage. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that 1.1 million new nurses are needed by next year (2022).

Because they will continue to play such a significant role in the future, nurses can benefit by looking into continuing education (CE). Though it may seem difficult right now due to extra workload and restrictions, there are several options for busy nurses that provide long-term benefits.

How Nurses Can Pursue Continuing Education

continuing education for nursesSome colleges offer weekend and night classes for in-person learning. For instance, St. Catherine University offers a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program that limits daytime commitments. Such courses offer a hands-on teaching method that can be helpful for those who are hoping to refresh their skills.

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Healthcare Worker Discounts 2021

healthcare worker discountsThis past year, our nation’s healthcare workers have shown us what strength, courage and sacrifice really mean. To show our gratitude for all their hard work, we have compiled a list of healthcare worker discounts from some of our favorite merchants and vendors. Keep reading to find out all the places where you can make your dollar go farther.


Healthcare Worker Discounts: Bags & Blankets

Big Blanket Co
Big Blanket Co is offering military members, first responders, medical professionals and teachers a special promotion code. Professional verification via VerifyPass is required to redeem this offer.

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Self-Care for Nurses

You have probably heard the expression that “you can’t pour water from an empty cup.” But what reservoirs of replenishment are available to healthcare workers battling a global pandemic? While there are no quick and easy fixes for this dilemma, one thing is certain: self-care for nurses has never been needed more.

What is self-care?

Self-care is defined as “anything you do to take care of yourself so you can stay physically, mentally and emotionally well” (Everyday Health). In essence, self-care is the sum of all the steps or actions you take to combat the negative effects of stress (e.g., anxiety, depression, lack of motivation, restlessness).

It is important to note that self-care is not the same as being selfish (lacking consideration for others) or self-indulgent (giving unrestrained gratification to one’s own desires). In fact, it is the complete opposite. Those who regularly practice self-care are better equipped to meet the demands of life and the needs of others on a consistent basis.

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4 Ways Nurses Can Advocate for Patients

“Patient advocacy” is a buzzword floating around every American healthcare system, but what does this catch phrase really mean? Beyond that, how can clinicians, especially nurses, best advocate for patients under their care? Keep reading to find out the answers to these questions and more.

What Is Patient Advocacy?

An advocate is “one who supports or promotes the interests of a cause or group” (Merriam-Webster). Therefore, patient advocacy is the act of “supporting” or “promoting” the interests of patients.

Regardless of their specialty, all nurses have an obligation to advocate for their patients. In essence, this means nurses have an obligation to protect their patients from harm, regardless of the harm’s source. While nurses never tell their patients what to do, they undertake actions to uphold the rights of those in their care.

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Women’s History Month: A Celebration

In 1987, President Ronald Reagan, at the request of the National Women’s History Project and Congress, designated March as Women’s History Month. Since that historic occasion 34 years ago, each March has been set apart to “reflect on the often-overlooked contributions of women to United States history” (History.com).

In keeping with the spirit of the month and as a certified Women’s Business Enterprise, we thought it would be appropriate to ask our employees a series of questions about the women that have played a significant role in their lives. Below are some of their answers.


Who has been the most influential woman in your life and why?

“My mother has been the most influential woman in my life. She is strong, confident and very intelligent. She taught me what it means to work hard and enjoy life. She taught me how important it is to have a strong support system of female friends and how wonderful life can be with great girlfriends.” – Brianna H.

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How Hospital Design Affects Nurses

And How to Improve It

Dealing with a global pandemic is challenging, but it is also an opportunity to acknowledge the miraculous work performed by our doctors, nurses and other medical professionals. These people keep saving lives day after day, and we need to do whatever we can to make their jobs easier and more bearable. That is why their superiors insist on the most functional hospital design they can create. So how does this factor affect the nurses in particular, since they are the ones who spend the majority of their time caring for the patients?

Less walking, more nursing

nurse running due to poor hospital designThis is something the patients and the doctors probably do not notice, but the fact is that nurses spend most of their time walking. Not helping people, not caring for them, not saving their lives – but walking!

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Celebrating Black Leaders in Healthcare

In honor of Black History Month, we are taking a moment to commemorate Black leaders in healthcare. Join us as we examine the lives, work and achievements of four truly inspirational figures that changed the healthcare landscape for the better.

Black Leaders in Healthcare

Mary Eliza Mahoney, Professional Nurse

Mary Eliza MahoneyAfrican American Leaders in Healthcare_Mahoney was born in the spring of 1845. Her parents were freed slaves that had moved to Boston, Massachusetts from North Carolina. During her early years, Mahoney attended the Phillips School in Boston, which after 1855, became one of the first integrated schools in the country.

As a teenager, Mahoney became interested in a career in nursing. She initially worked as an untrained practical nurse for several prominent white families before entering a formal training program. On March 23, 1878, Mahoney became the first Black woman to be admitted to the nursing program at the New England Hospital for Women and Children. The program ran for 16 months and was quite intensive. Students were required to attend lectures and work, resulting in 16-hour+ days.

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